How To: Stop a nosebleed easily

In this tutorial, we learn tips from roadies. If you experience a nosebleed and don't know how to handle it, there is a very simple way to cure it. First, take a long string and tie it around the middle of your hand a few times until it's tight. Then, make a fist with your hand and squeeze for two minutes. By the time the two minutes is up, your nosebleed should have subsided. Another tip, is for when you have hiccups. First, take a pen and press it on the inside of the ear. After a few secon...

How To: Treat burns and scalds (British Red Cross)

No one can escape the wrath of fire. Eery living person will experience some sort of burn during their lifespan, from scalds to third degree burns. Burns and scalds are among the most common injuries requiring emergency treatment in hospitals, but would you know what to do if a friend or family member, maybe even a stranger, burned themselves badly? Could you help?

How To: Use a curved needle for suturing arterial lines

This video shows the method to suture arterial lines using a curved needle. We will use the new arterial line kit for our demonstration. We will use a curved needle as it is safer than the straight needle. Hold the suture with the hamostat at about sixty percent from the tip of the needle. Do the turn the key method to bring the needle out from the other side. Unclamp it and re-clamp it at the tip of the needle. Continue the turn the key method. Pull the suture up and through. Cut the suture ...

How To: Draw blood from an arterial line

In this tutorial, we learn how to draw blood from an arterial line. First, you will need a catheter, tubing, regular iv tubing, 10 cc syringe, transducer, fluid bag, and iv saline bag. First, waste a couple ml's of blood by turning the stock cock off to the system and draw back a couple liters of blood. After this, turn the stock cock off the syringe and take out the syringe, then add a new one. Now, take your sample of blood and draw out 5 ml of new blood. Take out the syringe, then cap it a...

How To: Wrap up your broken toe at home

We all make the same mistake at some point. Walking around, minding your own business and then BAM you crush your toe right into a step, a wall, a small raise in the ground. Your toe is broken, you're shouting like a sailor, and your toe now looks like a swollen grape. Don't worry, you don't have to go to the hospital. Instead, check out this great video where you learn how to wrap your broken toe to help it heal.

How To: Wrap a bandage correctly

Watch this instructional medical how-to video to learn how to wrap a bandage correctly. A circular wrap is used to wrap a small body region. First, three to four inches of the appropriate sized gauze wrap is unrolled and placed flat. It is held in place with the thumb of one hand as the bandage is rolled around to provide at least two overlapping layers of bandage. The excess bandage roll is trimmed and the gauze is secured in place with a strip of tape. Wrap a bandage correctly.

How To: Insert a proper PICC line into your patient

PICC stands for a peripherally inserted central catheter, and is usually inserted somewhere in your patient's uppper arm, giving access to the larger veins in the chest region. PICC lines are often desirable because they are the least risky way of giving central access to the veins near the heart, especially when your patient will need to have one for an extended period of time. This tutorial shows you everything you'll need to know about how to properly and safely insert a PICC line into you...

How To: Perform a figure 8 suture during surgery

There are a lot of different types of sutures out there, as any of your doctors, nurses, and medical students know, and performing them properly is a vital part of your job. This video details how to perform a figure of eight suture on a surgical patient. It is definitely made for the professional or student, so please, do not try this at home!

How To: Use a purse string suture during surgery

The purse string stitch is one of the more specialized stitches used during surgery: the purse string suture. This suture is used to seal an opening in a hollow organ in the body, like when a feeding tube is being inserted. It is a challenging maneuver, and mostly useful in internal medicine rather than external, but knowing it is essential to several types of surgery.

How To: Suture a wound with a first aid kit in austere conditions

In a wilderness survival situation, someone in your group suffering a major laceration is a catastrophe. Achieving sterility and suturing the wound closed will both be very difficult to achieve. This four-part video series features a detailed explanation and demonstration of how to use a basic first aid kit to suture a wound closed in an austere situation, such as out in the wilderness. Suturing a wound closed in an austere setting is a last resort, but knowing how to do it could keep you or ...

How To: Treat a bullet wound at home

If you've just been shot but can't be bothered with a trip to the hospital you may want to know how to remove a bullet yourself. Learn how to remove the bullet as well as clean and cauterize, and bandage the wound.

How To: Clear an obstructed airway on a child or infant

Use the abdominal thrust technique on a child with an obstructed airway. Infants are more fragile. Put the infant face down on one arm and rest your arm on your thigh. Administer 5 back blows between the infants shoulder blades. Turn infant over and administer 5 chest thrusts in the middle of the sternum. Repeat until airway is clear. Clear an obstructed airway on a child or infant.

How To: Open the airway if there is no neck injury

In an accident when the airway needs to be opened and you do not suspect a neck injury, use the head tilt-chin tilt technique. Turn the patient to their back by supporting their head and neck. Place one hand on the forehead and the other on the tip of the chin. Push down on the forhead and lift up and forward on the chin. This will lift the tongue from the back of the throat and clear the airway. Open the airway if there is no neck injury.

How To: Treat minor cooking burns at home

It's impossible to learn how to cook without getting burned a few times. First, learn how to avoid getting burned (like using potholders and taking care around hot stoves). If you accidentally get burned, here is how you can treat the minor burns with water and first aid supplies.

How To: Remove nitrile exam gloves properly and safely

Nitrile exam gloves are the latest in disposable medical glove technology. They withstand stress well and won't trigger latex allergies, making them a great choice for first aid work. Watch this video to learn how to remove them properly, ensuring that your skin is not contaminated by whatever you were trying to keep off them with the gloves.

How To: Stop bleeding with pressure and gauze

In this tutorial, we learn how to stop bleeding with pressure and gauze. If someone around you gets hurt and is bleeding, the very first thing you will want to do is put pressure on the area that is bleeding. If you don't have gauze, use a shirt or a towel. Do not touch the blood directly, as this can cause disease and other complications. Push down on the area firmly with your entire hand and take the victim to a hospital to get checked out, if the wound is large enough. If it's a smaller cu...

How To: Manage a fever in children with Dr. Bill Gray

In this tutorial, we learn how to manage a fever in children. When your child has a fever, this means their body is fighting an infection. The fever will vary depending on what it is, but it will usually peak at 106 degrees. Don't bring the fever down with Tylenol, because it could make the cold last for a longer amount of time. This can be a greater threat to health than the illness was in the first place. If the child starts to get a higher fever, this is a good sign that the body is killin...

How To: Use the recovery position [signed] (British Red Cross)

Even those with hearing impairments need to know basic first aid procedures, because everyone, including deaf people, can save a life one day. People may collapse unexpectedly for a number of reasons, and people who faint periodically, or those who suffer frequent seizures or from epilepsy need help from others, so it's important that everyone know the proper first aid procedure for saving a collapsed victim casualty.

How To: Treat a choking person [signed] (British Red Cross)

Everyone should know how to perform basic first aid, especially for choking victims. This video will help deaf people and those with hearing impairment learn how to deal with choking, using sign language. Choking is serious life-threatening problem that need immediate attention. It could result in such problems as hypoxia or even death.

How To: Treat strains and sprains [signed] (British Red Cross)

Everyone should be able to perform basic first aid, even those with hearing impairment. Deaf individuals are just as likely to save a life as anyone else, but they need to know how, just like everyone else. This video is signed to help those with hearing problems learn about strains and sprains treatments. Although strains and sprains are not a serious injury, they are still very painful for the sufferer, and the only way to make sure they heal properly is to make sure they get immediate atte...

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