Hot First Aid How-Tos

How To: Use a curved needle for suturing arterial lines

This video shows the method to suture arterial lines using a curved needle. We will use the new arterial line kit for our demonstration. We will use a curved needle as it is safer than the straight needle. Hold the suture with the hamostat at about sixty percent from the tip of the needle. Do the turn the key method to bring the needle out from the other side. Unclamp it and re-clamp it at the tip of the needle. Continue the turn the key method. Pull the suture up and through. Cut the suture ...

How To: Stop bleeding

The human body contains nine units of blood—but in matters of a traumatic cut or injury, it's always better to be safe than sorry. If you're unsure whether you're in an emergency situation, get to an emergency room and let them decide.

How To: Perform a figure 8 suture during surgery

There are a lot of different types of sutures out there, as any of your doctors, nurses, and medical students know, and performing them properly is a vital part of your job. This video details how to perform a figure of eight suture on a surgical patient. It is definitely made for the professional or student, so please, do not try this at home!

How To: Clear an obstructed airway on a child or infant

Use the abdominal thrust technique on a child with an obstructed airway. Infants are more fragile. Put the infant face down on one arm and rest your arm on your thigh. Administer 5 back blows between the infants shoulder blades. Turn infant over and administer 5 chest thrusts in the middle of the sternum. Repeat until airway is clear. Clear an obstructed airway on a child or infant.

How To: Draw blood from an arterial line

In this tutorial, we learn how to draw blood from an arterial line. First, you will need a catheter, tubing, regular iv tubing, 10 cc syringe, transducer, fluid bag, and iv saline bag. First, waste a couple ml's of blood by turning the stock cock off to the system and draw back a couple liters of blood. After this, turn the stock cock off the syringe and take out the syringe, then add a new one. Now, take your sample of blood and draw out 5 ml of new blood. Take out the syringe, then cap it a...

How To: Wrap up your broken toe at home

We all make the same mistake at some point. Walking around, minding your own business and then BAM you crush your toe right into a step, a wall, a small raise in the ground. Your toe is broken, you're shouting like a sailor, and your toe now looks like a swollen grape. Don't worry, you don't have to go to the hospital. Instead, check out this great video where you learn how to wrap your broken toe to help it heal.

How To: Remove nitrile exam gloves properly and safely

Nitrile exam gloves are the latest in disposable medical glove technology. They withstand stress well and won't trigger latex allergies, making them a great choice for first aid work. Watch this video to learn how to remove them properly, ensuring that your skin is not contaminated by whatever you were trying to keep off them with the gloves.

How To: Immobilize an ankle

Learn how to immobilize an ankle. The ankle is a complex joint, so when an injury occurs, and you can't get help right away, the first thing to do is keep it from moving – you'll prevent any more damage to the surrounding nerves and tissue.

How To: Perform a horizontal mattress suture on a patient

The horizontal mattress suture allows the doctor or nurse performing them to minimize the tension being applied to a patient's wound by the stitch, which facilitates healing. This video features a doctor demonstrating how to perform such a suture on a pig's leg, teaching you one of the techniques that will help make you a more successful medical professional.

How To: Use the recovery position (British Red Cross)

People may collapse unexpectedly for a number of reasons, and people who faint periodically, or those who suffer frequent seizures or from epilepsy need help from others, so it's important that everyone know the proper first aid procedure for saving a collapsed victim casualty.

How To: Perform an interrupted and a subcuticular suture

If you want to perform an interrupted and a subcuticular suture you should first make a bite through the skin. In order to make a bite through the skin you should put the needle point perpendicular to the surface, turn your wrist and make sure it arrives at an even point from the entry point. Grasp the needle as it comes from the tissue. Make sure you always keep the needle in view. Then ti e the suture with an instrument tie and form the knot on the side of the wound so it does not effect th...

How To: Treat a mosquito bite

Don't let the fear of those red, itchy mosquito bites keep you from enjoying the outdoors this summer. Even if your mosquito repellant doesn't work and you end up getting bitten there are some easy household items that will alleviate any discomfort.

How To: Treat a bullet wound at home

If you've just been shot but can't be bothered with a trip to the hospital you may want to know how to remove a bullet yourself. Learn how to remove the bullet as well as clean and cauterize, and bandage the wound.

How To: Insert a proper PICC line into your patient

PICC stands for a peripherally inserted central catheter, and is usually inserted somewhere in your patient's uppper arm, giving access to the larger veins in the chest region. PICC lines are often desirable because they are the least risky way of giving central access to the veins near the heart, especially when your patient will need to have one for an extended period of time. This tutorial shows you everything you'll need to know about how to properly and safely insert a PICC line into you...

How To: Wrap a bandage correctly

Watch this instructional medical how-to video to learn how to wrap a bandage correctly. A circular wrap is used to wrap a small body region. First, three to four inches of the appropriate sized gauze wrap is unrolled and placed flat. It is held in place with the thumb of one hand as the bandage is rolled around to provide at least two overlapping layers of bandage. The excess bandage roll is trimmed and the gauze is secured in place with a strip of tape. Wrap a bandage correctly.

How To: Bandage an elbow

Bandaging an injured elbow is simply logical: if you physically compress the area, it won't be able to swell as it might if left to its own devices. It's also a pretty simple process.

How To: Wrap an injured ankle

The last thing you want to do with an injured ankle is to hurt it further by wrapping it up improperly. Fortunately, wrapping an ankle is easy once you know how. And this free video first aid tutorial will show you precisely what you'll need to do. For more information, including detailed, step-by-step instructions, take a look!

How To: Suture a wound in a hospital setting

Suturing wounds is one of the most important parts of any doctor's job, and learning how to do so should be among the first priorities of any medical student. This three-part video covers all of the basics of suturing a wound in a hospital setting. It features information on infiltrating anesthetic, choosing how many sutures to use, and other techniques.

How To: Wrap a sprained ankle

Assemble the necessary equipment: a roll of 1- to 2-inch-wide athletic tape and a pair of scissors. Wrap one piece of athletic tape under the heel of the foot and bring both ends up the ankle to either side of the leg. The tape should form a "U," like the stirrup on a horse's saddle.

How To: Keep a cut from scarring

Keep it clean, covered, and coated, and say goodbye to that scar from the get-go. You will need running water and mild soap, self adhesive bandages, antibiotic ointment, petroleum jelly, sunblock, and silicone gel sheets. Warning: See a doctor immediately if your cut is extremely deep, won't stop bleeding, or appears infected.

How To: Recognize and treat the 5 C's of a fever in children

Dr. Chris Steele guides us through how to find the 5 Cs of a sick child. When you have a child who is running a fever, it's important to remember not to heat up your home and wrap them in a ton of blankets. This is the worst thing you can do because you're increasing the warmth around them, which is going to increase their brain and body temperature. If your child has a fever, remember to cool them. Cool their room, cool a wash cloth to place on them, cool drinks, cool ice cream, and cool bed...

How To: Stop a nosebleed easily

In this tutorial, we learn tips from roadies. If you experience a nosebleed and don't know how to handle it, there is a very simple way to cure it. First, take a long string and tie it around the middle of your hand a few times until it's tight. Then, make a fist with your hand and squeeze for two minutes. By the time the two minutes is up, your nosebleed should have subsided. Another tip, is for when you have hiccups. First, take a pen and press it on the inside of the ear. After a few secon...

How To: Use a purse string suture during surgery

The purse string stitch is one of the more specialized stitches used during surgery: the purse string suture. This suture is used to seal an opening in a hollow organ in the body, like when a feeding tube is being inserted. It is a challenging maneuver, and mostly useful in internal medicine rather than external, but knowing it is essential to several types of surgery.

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